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submitted 17 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Brussels has reacted to Viktor Orban's "peace mission" to Moscow by snubbing Hungary's six months as European Council president. It will only send civil servants, not Commissioners, to meetings chaired by Hungary.

The executive arm of the EU in Brussels is partially boycotting Hungary's six-month stint holding the bloc's rotating presidency, in response to Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban's self-styled "peace mission" that he embarked on after taking up the position at the start of the month. 

In the first days of Hungary's presidency, Orban visited KyivMoscowBeijing, and Washington for a NATO summit, and then Donald Trump in Florida.

The trip to Kyiv was Orban's first since Russia's invasion, despite Hungary bordering Ukraine.

He called the trip a peace mission and tried to portray himself as one of the "very few" EU and NATO heads of government still able to hold productive talks in Moscow and negotiate with all sides.

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submitted 18 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

A top Russian tank touted by Russian President Vladimir Putin as the "world's best" has suffered at least 100 losses in the war in Ukraine, according to open-source information.

The losses were recorded by Oryx, an open-source intelligence site that relies on visual evidence to confirm and track war losses on both sides. More T-90Ms may have also been lost in combat but not recorded. Business Insider was unable to independently verify the information.

Losses, per the site's analysis, include destroyed, damaged, and captured vehicles.

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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Dozens of Indian farm labourers have been freed from slave-like working conditions in northern Italy, police have said.

The 33 workers were lured to Italy on the promise of jobs and a better future by two fellow Indian nationals, police say.

But instead, they were allegedly forced to work more than 10 hours a day, seven days a week for a tiny wage which was used to pay off debts to the alleged gangmasters.

The two men - who were found with approximately $545,300 (£420,000) - have been arrested.

The exploitation of farmhands – both Italian and migrant - in Italy is a well-known issue. Thousands of people work in fields, vineyards and greenhouses dotted across the country, often without contracts and in highly dangerous conditions.

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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Scientists have for the first time discovered a cave on the Moon.

At least 100m deep, it could be an ideal place for humans to build a permanent base, they say.

It is just one in probably hundreds of caves hidden in an “underground, undiscovered world”, according to the researchers.

Countries are racing to establish a permanent human presence on the Moon, but they will need to protect astronauts from radiation, extreme temperatures, and space weather.

Helen Sharman, the first British astronaut to travel to space, told BBC News that the newly-discovered cave looked like a good place for a base, and suggested humans could potentially be living in lunar pits in 20-30 years.

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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Media in China recently reported that fuel tankers are being used to transport cooking oil. The report has ignited public outrage over food safety, which has long been an issues as suppliers cut corners to save costs.

A scandal over cooking-oil contamination in China that came to light earlier in July highlights the long-standing struggle to improve food safety measures. 

The scandal, first revealed by state-backed media The Beijing News on July 2, involves two Chinese companies that reportedly used fuel trucks to transport edible oil without any cleaning process between loads.

In 2005 and 2015, Chinese media uncovered similar practices of improperly transporting food oil.

Another food safety problem known to authorities is the use of "gutter oil," which is cooking oil recycled from drains and grease traps, and cheaply sold off to restaurants.

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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Gambian lawmakers have blocked an attempt to re-legalize female genital cutting after months of debate. The practice remains common in the West African country, despite the upheld ban.

Gambian lawmakers on Monday upheld a 2015 ban on female genital mutilation (FGM), despite pressure from religious traditionalists in the West African country.

Lawmakers rejected a controversial bill, introduced earlier in 2024, that sought to enshrine "female circumcision" as a religious and cultural practice.

Following months of heated debate, legislators ended the bill's chances by rejecting all its clauses and blocking any further vote.

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submitted 19 hours ago by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Projected results from the election commission after polls closed in Rwanda put incumbent Paul Kagame on 99.15%. Turnout was said to be 98%. Only two opposition candidates with no real profile were allowed to run.

More than 9 million Rwandans were called to vote for a new president on Monday, and according to official results, more than 99% of them supported the incumbent Paul Kagame for a fourth term.

Soon after polls closed on Monday evening, the election commission said that Kagame had won 99.15% of the votes. 

It also put turnout at a staggeringly high 98%. By comparison, even in those few countries where citizens are legally obliged to vote or face a fine, such as Australia, turnout only ever tends to be between 90 and 95%.

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A city in northern Germany has become the first to issue an all-out ban on the use of a hand gesture used to encourage silence in the classroom because of its close resemblance to a far-right Turkish gesture.

The “silent fox” gesture – where the hand is posed to resemble an animal with upright ears (the little and forefinger) and a closed mouth (the middle fingers pressed against the thumb) – has long been seen as a useful teaching tool by educators in Germany and elsewhere. It signals to children that they should stop talking and listen to their teacher.

But authorities in the port city of Bremen say the symbol is “in danger of being mistaken” for the right-wing extremist “wolf salute”, from which it is indistinguishable.

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Bankir and his men have been trying to fight off Russian attacks along the Ukrainian front lines for more than two years. But it’s only now that they are finally able to strike where it hurts: Inside Russia’s own territory.

The newly granted permission by the United States and other allies to use Western weapons to strike inside Russia has had a huge impact, Bankir said. “We have destroyed targets inside Russia, which allowed for several successful counteroffensives. The Russian military can no longer feel impunity and security,” the senior officer in Ukraine’s Security Service (SBU) told CNN. For security reasons, he asked to be identified by his call sign only.

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When two young Brazilian women were reported missing in September 2022, their families and the FBI launched a desperate search across the US to find them. All they knew was that they were living with wellness influencer Kat Torres.

Torres has now been sentenced to eight years in prison for the human trafficking and slavery of one of those women. The BBC has also been told that charges have been filed against her in relation to a second woman.

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submitted 1 day ago* (last edited 1 day ago) by MicroWave@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Mutilated and dismembered bodies were found in plastic bags at a dump site in the Mukuru slums of southern Nairobi. Preliminary investigations revealed that all the bodies were female.

Mutilated and dismembered bodies were founded in plastic bags at a garbage dump in the Mukuru slums of southern Nairobi.

Six bodies were found on Friday and additional body parts were found on Saturday, acting national police chief Douglas Kanja said at a press conference. Eight bodies were found in total.

Preliminary investigations revealed that all the bodies were female.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 3 points 5 days ago

Thanks. I’ve updated the post.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 9 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

I don’t think so. There are other important parts in the article:

For the first time, the annual event will also involve troops from the Australian and French military. Fourteen other countries in Asia and Europe will attend as observers. The exercises will run until May 10.

The 2024 exercises are also the first to take place outside of Philippine territorial waters

"Some of the exercises will take place in the South China Sea in an area outside of the Philippines' territorial sea. It's a direct challenge to China's expansive claims" in the region, Philippine political analyst Richard Heydarian told DW.

He added that some of the exercises this year will also be close to Taiwan.

This year's exercises have a "dual orientation pushing against China's aggressive intentions both in the South China Sea but also in Taiwan," he added.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 15 points 2 months ago

According to ProPublica, it’s commonly done using Leahy Laws:

The recommendations came from a special committee of State Department officials known as the Israel Leahy Vetting Forum. The panel, made up of Middle East and human rights experts, is named for former Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the chief author of 1997 laws that requires the U.S. to cut off assistance to any foreign military or law enforcement units — from battalions of soldiers to police stations — that are credibly accused of flagrant human rights violations.

Over the years, hundreds of foreign units, including from Mexico, Colombia and Cambodia, have been blocked from receiving any new aid. Officials say enforcing the Leahy Laws can be a strong deterrent against human rights abuses.

https://www.propublica.org/article/israel-gaza-blinken-leahy-sanctions-human-rights-violations

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 40 points 3 months ago* (last edited 3 months ago)

It wasn’t me!

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 12 points 3 months ago

Just pointing out the headline seems to imply it’s from WaPo when in fact it was written by RT.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 24 points 3 months ago* (last edited 3 months ago)

Agreed. Here's some more context:

Korea has the second-lowest number of physicians among members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, leading to some of the highest doctors' wages among surveyed member nations.

Doctors in Korea earn the most among 28 member countries that provided related data. Following Korea, the highest earners are in the Netherlands, Germany, Ireland and the UK. The US was among the countries for which data was not provided.

Measured by PPP, which takes into account local living costs, salaried specialists earned an average of $192,749 annually in 2020, According to the 2023 OECD Health Statistics report. That was 60 percent more than the OECD average. Korean GP salaries ranked sixth.

... The country also ranked low in the number of medical school graduates -- 7.3 per 100,000 people, which is the third-lowest after Israel and Japan, and nearly half the OCED average of 14 graduates for every 100,000 people.

https://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20230730000088

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 8 points 3 months ago* (last edited 3 months ago)

These doctors are not telling the whole story. More context from the article:

Public surveys show that a majority of South Koreans support the government’s push to create more doctors, and critics say that doctors, one of the highest-paid professions in South Korea, worry about lower incomes due to a rise in the number of doctors.

Officials say more doctors are required to address a long-standing shortage of physicians in rural areas and in essential but low-paying specialties. But doctors say newly recruited students would also try to work in the capital region and in high-paying fields like plastic surgery and dermatology. They say the government plan would also likely result in doctors performing unnecessary treatments due to increased competition.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 7 points 4 months ago

Your comment seems to suggest that the boat was far away from Taiwan, which was not the case. For context, the boat was touring Taiwan’s Kinmen Islands, which are just a few kilometers/miles from the Chinese mainland (Wikipedia says 10 km/6.2 mi), and had to veer toward the Chinese side of the water to avoid shoals.

According to the article, this seems like an escalation by the PRC:

For years, sightseeing boat tours between Kinmen and Xiamen, the closest city on the Chinese mainland, have offered Taiwanese tourists a chance to gaze at China’s dazzling skyline without the hassle of border checks, with China operating similar tour boats for its citizens too.

...

Ian Chong, a political scientist at the National University of Singapore, said the latest measures are part of China’s “gray zone” tactics, referring to coercive or aggressive state actions that stop short of open warfare – something Beijing has used increasingly in recent years in the East and South China Seas, as well as toward Taiwan.

The inspection of a Taiwanese tour boat by China’s coast guard, which Chong said had not happened before, was meant to provoke Taiwan and see if it would either escalate or accept this sort of behavior as given.

[-] MicroWave@lemmy.world 17 points 5 months ago

To be more specific:

Asbestos is a known carcinogen to humans, meaning it is capable of causing cancer. When asbestos fibres become airborne and are inhaled, they are known to lodge in the lungs and other parts of the airways, where they can cause scarring, inflammation, asbestosis – an inflammatory condition leading to permanent lung damage – and cell damage that lead to cancers, including mesothelioma, an incurable cancer of the lining that covers organs such as the lungs. For decades, however, the risk from swallowing asbestos has been thought of as small as most fibres were assumed to pass through the gut and be expelled in faeces.

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MicroWave

joined 1 year ago