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submitted 30 minutes ago by joojmachine@lemmy.ml to c/linux@lemmy.ml
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submitted 23 minutes ago* (last edited 14 minutes ago) by BeatTakeshi@lemmy.world to c/linux@lemmy.ml

Hello, I have this weird issue that my Debian 11 will tell me the root folder is full, while I can only find files for half of the accounted space.

df -h reports 56G while the disk analyser (sudo baobab) only finds 28G.

Anyone ever encountered this? I don't have anything mounted twice.... (Not sure what udev is)

df -h /dev/sda* Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on udev 16G 0 16G 0% /dev /dev/sda1 511M 22M 490M 5% /boot/efi /dev/sda2 63G 56G 4.1G 94% / udev 16G 0 16G 0% /dev /dev/sda4 852G 386G 423G 48% /home

Edit: my mtab

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submitted 36 minutes ago by Wilshire@lemmy.world to c/ukraine@sopuli.xyz
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submitted 57 minutes ago by FookReddit69@lemm.ee to c/asklemmy@lemmy.ml

I just don't get it... Why is that important, especially for kids now, that feel like they need to do a YouTube video asking for a date or doing some meme stuff. Some teens even hire the hottest celebrity or ask them to appear in their prom? This is so bizarre for me, all that just for a frivolous night.

In my country prom was a thing but nowhere near as theatrical, I didn't went to either my prom trip or the party. Also skipped half of my middle school trips.

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submitted 1 hour ago by Sear@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 36 minutes ago by boem@lemmy.world to c/technology@lemmy.world
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submitted 1 hour ago by RandAlThor@lemmy.ca to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 1 hour ago* (last edited 1 hour ago) by Linkerbaan@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world

Israeli forces have re-arrested the elderly Palestinian parliament speaker Aziz Dweik less than a week after his release in the occupied West Bank city of Hebron.

Local Palestinian media reported that Dweik was arrested late on Wednesday with footage showing Israeli soldiers taking him from his home and into a military vehicle.

Dweik was released on 13 June after originally being arbitrarily detained in October. He was held in military detention in the Negev desert for six months, which was later extended by Israeli authorities.

Activists and social media users raised the alarm about his condition after appearing significantly thinner on his release than before his detention in October.

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submitted 49 minutes ago by RubberDuck@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 1 hour ago by iusearchbtw@lemm.ee to c/games@lemmy.world

Article textNewly-restructured Swedish conglomerate, Embracer Group, will leverage AI models to bolster game production.

As noted in Embracer's annual report, the company has adopted a new AI policy package it claims has the capability to "massively enhance" its production process by "increasing resource efficiency, adding intelligent behaviors, personalization, and optimization to gameplay experiences."

Embracer says that, by leveraging AI, it will be able to create more engaging and immersive experiences that provide each player with a "unique, dynamic, and personalised experience."

"We also see great opportunities for AI in game development speed, logistics and planning. Embracer Group also understands the potential risks associated with the use of AI," adds the company, noting that "AI can also be used within areas such as logistics or HR to improve planning, decision-making, support talent acquisition and enhance employee experiences or retention."

Embracer, which laid off over 1,500 employees and cancelled 80 projects during the past year, suggests that not using AI for "relevant tasks" will lead to it being "outrun by our competitors."

The company concedes that adopting AI models isn't without risk, but claims the policy will "empower" workers to help the create "more powerful experiences in the same amount of time."

"Companies within Embracer Group that utilize AI within their operations are subject to general as well as specific laws and requirements that impact the development and use of AI. These requirements are, due to the nature of AI applications, comprehensive and require, among others, documentation, risk assessments as well as continuous updates," reads the company's risk assessment.

"AI may also produce unethical, biased, discriminatory or completely wrong results if it has not been properly trained, instructed or used for purposes it was not designed. Additionally, AI generated material is not patentable or copyrightable meaning we must understand how material is produced, especially by third parties, since such material may produce serious copyright or intellectual property issues with the final product." Embracer says AI models won't supplant human workers

Embracer states it doesn't want to replace people with AI and is taking a "human-centric approach" to the technology–going so far as to claim it could open the door for new hires.

"It's not just that AI enables our developers to do even more, and to become more efficient on certain tasks, it will also open up coding to a broader group of developers. Entry into the industry might be easier for individuals with disabilities who, for instance, cannot use a keyboard as easily as others," said Embracer's head of privacy and AI governance, Tomas Hedman.

Hedman says the company's "risk-aware approach" means being cognizant of the pitfalls associated with AI models. That's why, he says, Embracer must "act consciously."

"AI is trained on historical data, which tilts in a certain direction. As a result, you can end up with imbalanced automated decision-making. Let’s say you’re building a village. If you use AI for this, depending on how it’s trained and the decisions it takes, you may end up with a village with a demography that displays some sort of imbalance," says Hedman.

"As AI models become more powerful, we can leverage their capacity also in the creative process, for example, by identifying inconsistencies in scripts and storytelling. There will be tremendous benefits for our creative teams regarding scriptwriting, image creation, idea generation, quality control, and more. And, as models become more human-like, the interaction between players and AI-supported functions will be much more dynamic. If in a game scenario you bargain, AI can remember this the next time. That makes the whole gaming experience much more interesting and lifelike."

Embracer isn't the first company to espouse the potential of AI. Earlier this year, EA boss Andrew Wilson claimed 60 percent of the publisher's development processes could soon be impacted by generative AI. Others including Sony, Square Enix, Ubisoft, and more have also begun tinkering with the tech.

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submitted 1 hour ago by RandAlThor@lemmy.ca to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 1 hour ago by RandAlThor@lemmy.ca to c/world@lemmy.world
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submitted 13 minutes ago by Wilshire@lemmy.world to c/world@lemmy.world
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cross-posted from: https://lemm.ee/post/35081279

Article textNewly-restructured Swedish conglomerate, Embracer Group, will leverage AI models to bolster game production.

As noted in Embracer's annual report, the company has adopted a new AI policy package it claims has the capability to "massively enhance" its production process by "increasing resource efficiency, adding intelligent behaviors, personalization, and optimization to gameplay experiences."

Embracer says that, by leveraging AI, it will be able to create more engaging and immersive experiences that provide each player with a "unique, dynamic, and personalised experience."

"We also see great opportunities for AI in game development speed, logistics and planning. Embracer Group also understands the potential risks associated with the use of AI," adds the company, noting that "AI can also be used within areas such as logistics or HR to improve planning, decision-making, support talent acquisition and enhance employee experiences or retention."

Embracer, which laid off over 1,500 employees and cancelled 80 projects during the past year, suggests that not using AI for "relevant tasks" will lead to it being "outrun by our competitors."

The company concedes that adopting AI models isn't without risk, but claims the policy will "empower" workers to help the create "more powerful experiences in the same amount of time."

"Companies within Embracer Group that utilize AI within their operations are subject to general as well as specific laws and requirements that impact the development and use of AI. These requirements are, due to the nature of AI applications, comprehensive and require, among others, documentation, risk assessments as well as continuous updates," reads the company's risk assessment.

"AI may also produce unethical, biased, discriminatory or completely wrong results if it has not been properly trained, instructed or used for purposes it was not designed. Additionally, AI generated material is not patentable or copyrightable meaning we must understand how material is produced, especially by third parties, since such material may produce serious copyright or intellectual property issues with the final product." Embracer says AI models won't supplant human workers

Embracer states it doesn't want to replace people with AI and is taking a "human-centric approach" to the technology–going so far as to claim it could open the door for new hires.

"It's not just that AI enables our developers to do even more, and to become more efficient on certain tasks, it will also open up coding to a broader group of developers. Entry into the industry might be easier for individuals with disabilities who, for instance, cannot use a keyboard as easily as others," said Embracer's head of privacy and AI governance, Tomas Hedman.

Hedman says the company's "risk-aware approach" means being cognizant of the pitfalls associated with AI models. That's why, he says, Embracer must "act consciously."

"AI is trained on historical data, which tilts in a certain direction. As a result, you can end up with imbalanced automated decision-making. Let’s say you’re building a village. If you use AI for this, depending on how it’s trained and the decisions it takes, you may end up with a village with a demography that displays some sort of imbalance," says Hedman.

"As AI models become more powerful, we can leverage their capacity also in the creative process, for example, by identifying inconsistencies in scripts and storytelling. There will be tremendous benefits for our creative teams regarding scriptwriting, image creation, idea generation, quality control, and more. And, as models become more human-like, the interaction between players and AI-supported functions will be much more dynamic. If in a game scenario you bargain, AI can remember this the next time. That makes the whole gaming experience much more interesting and lifelike."

Embracer isn't the first company to espouse the potential of AI. Earlier this year, EA boss Andrew Wilson claimed 60 percent of the publisher's development processes could soon be impacted by generative AI. Others including Sony, Square Enix, Ubisoft, and more have also begun tinkering with the tech.

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submitted 25 minutes ago by nanoUFO@sh.itjust.works to c/games@sh.itjust.works
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Currently, Prusa is doing a terrible job with the Printables competition, to the point where they could be in legal trouble if someone were to push for it.

A few examples to prove this statement (5th is in my opinion the worst):

  1. insect hotel -> canceled due to security concerns. Great work, but why not look into it before you start and provide a design guideline? https://www.printables.com/contest/436-insect-hotels

  2. Bathtub toys -> Mentioned explicitly: "Safety is our top priority, so make sure your creations are child-friendly, [...]". As these are bath toys, one might assume that they mean safety standards for young children. https://www.printables.com/contest/428-bathtub-toys

Great. Safety is a top priority. So let's see how they moderate it. They haven't... If you scroll through the valid submissions, there are dozens that aren't safe for children. Prusa is EU, so I would expect them to be familiar with the basic EU regulations for children's toys when they say we want safety first. There are very strict test requirements that a toy has to meet. The simplest one is a bin/cylinder that a part cannot fit into (choking hazard). Does every design meet this very basic design rule? No. Next comes impact resistance and the like. Does the design meet these requirements? no.

You could say that it's just not feasible to review every submission, so let's take a look at the winning entries that they definitely looked at: Rubber Band Submarine. I'm not a toy designer, but I'm pretty sure that an exposed rubber band is not safe for small children, who are the target audience for bath toys.

  1. fish tank tweaks: Recommending PLA for prints that are permanently submerged ("It is usually recommended to use ABS or specific food-safe PLA..."). Seriously???? These days they are PLA under these conditions is rubbish within a year. Discoloration and expansion destroy some PLA blends/filaments.

  2. soldering aid: Seeing this design as a winning soldering aid raises serious questions as to whether the person involved has any practical experience in assembling electronics. Placing a PCB 2cm in the air with sharp objects around the mounting holes is the opposite of ergonomic and comfortable SMD soldering: https://www.printables.com/model/740818-parametric-stackable-pcb-standoffs-m2-m14-holes

****5. This contest had questionable practices and here's where things get wild. Now we're not just talking about knowledge gaps, we're talking about breaking your own rules, which could be a legal problem. One of the contest rules states: "A valid entry may change its slope, altitude or distance." Simple. Right? Not for Prusa: https://www.printables.com/model/837104-the-rig-r11-diy-helper-stand-for-testing-electroni

This is a winning entry that can't do any of those things, and would probably qualify as a generic holder (also not a valid entry).

Another winning entry that wouldn't be a valid entry if Prusa followed the contest rules: "Skip the organisers: We love a tidy workplace, but today we're focusing on ergonomic improvements": https://www.printables.com/model/808502-heat-insert-press

Want a third from the same competition? Here it is: https://www.printables.com/model/808502-heat-insert-press "Specific adaptability: Designs must provide flexibility in the user's interaction with the tool or aid (height, tilt, distance or orientation adjustments). Simply accommodating different sizes of objects doesn't quite fit the bill".

To recapitulate, Prusa broke the rules not once, not twice, but three times within this competition (which, being EU, has some legal requirements on how you can and can't run competitions) by awarding prizes with monetary value and talking them away from other competitions that followed the rules.

There is more wrong with how this was organized/done, but I think this is damning enough. Never assume evil, so I would kindly call it Prusa being utterly incompetent.****

  1. The current XPR challenge. Design a part for a robotics kit. Sounds exciting. First bummer, it's $115 + tax, but that wouldn't be noteworthy enough to write this:

6.1 To design for it a.) either buy it (providing a $35 discount if you do so) or b.) try to work with whatever this is: https://www.printables.com/model/576581-xrp-robot-part-of-the-experiential-consortia/files the picture shows a complete model with PCB and sensors (some connectors and wiring are missing) but would be workable. What do they actually deliver? The frame with no electronics or components. Good luck working with that.

6.2 While this may or may not go in the direction of predatory, there is more: "Photo quality - Well lit, in focus and clear photos will help showcase your work and help us choose the best designs." Quick questions: How do I take good and compelling photos without the $115 robot kit? | Prusa: "This also means that you don't need to own a 3D printer to enter". Question: "How do you make photos without a 3D print to show of? the wording is very clear that they mean photos and not computer 3d-Render. Just by looking at these two aspects, this thing has a $115 + tax ticket to improve the "chance" of winning.

6.3 Moral issues: This work is unpaid to begin with. Does Prusa really expect people to spend tens of manhours working on a good design, printing it, taking pictures, writing instructions and text, when they have absolutely no use for it themselves, since this kit has probably only been sold a handful of times to end users. There is only a small chance of wining something (remember exhibit 5 where they didn't even follow their own rules)?

Last but not least: "Popularity – Share your model to increase its popularity, and prove that users appreciate such a model." This is fairly common for some events and I always dislike it as this asking for free advertisement. Prusa at least limits it to the model itself while others use a broader approach where it is for the entire project/organization. Regardless such terms always have a negative impact. Just remember all the MakerWorld spam everywhere after they launched with high rewards.

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submitted 19 minutes ago by nanoUFO@sh.itjust.works to c/games@sh.itjust.works
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submitted 1 hour ago* (last edited 1 hour ago) by solidgrue@lemmy.world to c/homeassistant@lemmy.world

I missed it in the release notes, but there's a breaking change in the ota component in ESPHome 2024.6.0. I figured I'd save folks some time and share the fix here.

If your OTA config looks like this;

...

ota:
  password: "*************"
  num_tries: 3
  safe_mode: on

...

Now you'll need to add a platform key to start a list, and either comment out the other option or move them to a new component.

...

ota:
  - platform: esphome
    password: "*************"
  #num_tries: 3
  #safe_mode: on

...
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submitted 1 hour ago* (last edited 1 hour ago) by limelight79@lemm.ee to c/homeassistant@lemmy.world

No major question here, just thought you might find this interesting. It's an example of the kind of (off-the-wall) things you can do with HA that aren't immediately obvious. When I was starting out with HA, I enjoyed reading these examples, because it gave me ideas for my own setup. And, I wrote many automations that should really be scripts, so hopefully this will help someone avoid that and recognize the power of scripts early.

At home, my laptop from work sits (closed) on a stand under the monitors. I have a docking station for it, but the docking station doesn't have a power button to start the laptop (the official Dell docking stations have a power button, but other brand of docking stations don't). So, since I got that stand a few weeks ago, I've been pulling the laptop out and opening juuuuuuust enough that I could reach the power button, then closing it and sliding it back into the stand. There had to be a better way that didn't involve buying an expensive Dell docking station.

The docking station power is on a Sonoff S31 outlet (flashed with Tasmota, not that that's important here) that is remotely controllable. Long ago, I set up HA automations that turned on the S31 when the laptop was detected on the network, and shut off the S31 after the laptop dropped off the network at the end of the day (leaving in a time delay so it didn't shut off if there was a momentary network glitch). So, I'd boot the laptop, and a moment later the docking station would kick on and connect the mouse and monitors to it. And the end of the day, I shut down the laptop, and a few minutes later the docking station shuts off automatically.

I recently discovered the Wake on LAN integration. So, after setting that up, I wrote a script that turns on the S31, waits a while*, then triggers the Wake-on-LAN for the laptop...and it boots up! With HA, I can start the boot process while I'm still relaxing in the living room before starting work; in theory I'll go into the office and it'll be ready for me to log in.

Heck, if HA knew for certain it was a workday, it could boot the laptop for me.....hmmm. Maybe something to think about for the future.

*How long? Well, 30 seconds seems to be too short; the laptop doesn't respond to the WoL command after just 30 seconds with power applied. It did work this morning when I waited several minutes to try it again. I just changed the delay to 1 minute and will see how that works tomorrow.

I also added a repeat loop (starting after that 1 minute timer) with three components:

  • A condition that looks for the laptop being "Away" on the network. (If it is "Home" on the network, the condition will end the script.)
  • If it is, then it tries the WoL command again.
  • Then waits 30 seconds and repeat.

The repeat loop counter is set to 3, for a total of 4 attempts to start the laptop. I'll check the traces and see when it starts working, and set the initial delay accordingly, so that in general it shouldn't need the repeat loop.

If people want, I can post (sanitized) YAML. But I do like explaining the process rather than just posting code.

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submitted 4 minutes ago by schizoidman@lemmy.ml to c/world@lemmy.world
view more: next ›

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